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Perspective-Taking Interventions for Intergenerational Caregivers of Alzheimer’s Diseases: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
Purpose:The present study examined the effects of perspective-taking (PT) intervention in the context of intergenerational caregiving.Method:Seventy-two adult child caregivers of persons living with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) were randomized into two 8-week interventions: (1) connecting through caregiving (CTC: 37 participants) with intergenerational PT reappraisals and (2) basic skill building (BSB: 35 participants). The CTC intervention focused on PT reappraisals aiming to promote balance between self-care and caring of others: (1) connecting with self through enhancing self-awareness, (2) connecting with the care recipient through empathetic understanding, and (3) connecting with others who can help.Results:As compared to the BSB group, the CTC group reported significantly higher increase in the level of life satisfaction and also greater reductions in depressive symptoms and burden. PT was found to mediate between intervention effects and change in life satisfaction.Discussion:The results provided evidence for the efficacy of the CTC program in enhancing the well-being of AD caregivers.


An Ethical Foundation for Social Good: Virtue Theory and Solidarity

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Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
Purpose:Virtue theorists debate qualities of society leading to human flourishing. Thus, aspects of scholarship on virtue theory may refine conceptualization of social good. We focus on the virtue of solidarity and its contributions to the ethical foundations of social good, providing a core connection to macro-level social work interventions and settings.Methods:We first identify a theoretical gap in the conceptual framework of social good, then use virtue theory and the example of solidarity to connect the concept of social good to social work professional values and macro practice.Results:Our primary critique of the concept of social good is the lack of a sufficient ethical frame that addresses social justice, value foundations, or power analysis.Discussion:Without this, the discussion of social good lacks tools needed to critically assess relevant systems of change and innovative technologies. Consequently, the work of social good risks reinforcing existing status quo and oppressive systems.


Remediating Child Attachment Insecurity: Evaluating the Basic Trust Intervention in Adoptive Families

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Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
Purpose:This study evaluated the video-feedback intervention Basic Trust in families with internationally adoptive children aged 2–12 years. The intervention aims to reduce child attachment insecurity and behavior problems by enhancing mothers’ and fathers’ sensitivity and mind-mindedness (parents’ capacity to hold in mind the mind of their child).Method:Fifty-three adoptive families participated in a pretest, posttest, and 6-month follow-up assessment. Questionnaires on parenting stress, child attachment insecurity, and behavior problems were administered. Parents’ sensitivity was assessed from free-play observations at home, and mind-mindedness was measured with a describe-your-child interview.Results:Parents reported less child behavior problems, insecure and disorganized attachment, and parenting stress at posttest and follow-up. Parents’ mind-mindedness increased from pre- to post-test but not from pretest to follow-up. Parents’ sensitivity showed an improvement at follow-up.Conclusions:Future studies should investigate whether the present study’s positive results can be replicated under conditions of strict experimental control.


Improving Behavioral Health in Young People: It Is Time for Social Work to Adopt Prevention

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Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
Behavioral health problems in young people are often addressed through costly and ineffective treatment, rehabilitation, and control strategies aimed at helping children and adolescents after problems are identified. Evidence indicates that many behavioral health problems can be prevented before they occur, thereby saving significant individual, economic, and social costs. Although policy, practice, and research in reducing behavioral health problems have increased dramatically in the past several decades, social work has been slow to join other disciplines in the critical debate about the most effective and humane ways to prevent behavioral health problems. It is time for social work to adopt prevention as a guiding framework for practice, policy, advocacy, and research in behavioral health settings.


How White Nationalists See What They Want to See in DNA Tests

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What happens when white supremacists on the hate site Stormfront learn that they’re not as white as they thought? Two researchers investigated.