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Implementation Issues in Functional Family Therapy: A Narrative Analysis of the Evidence

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Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
This analysis of functional family therapy (FFT) studies examines whether their variable outcomes are attributable to implementation issues. Studies were identified firstly, by way of a recent overview, supplemented by an update of a highly sensitive search including 15 databases, 10 websites, all existing relevant reviews, gray literature as well as contacting experts in the field. Updated searches were conducted in August 2018 and were analyzed according to the Oxford Implementation Index and an assessment of supervision quality. In total, the search yielded 150 records; 48 full texts were retrieved of which 32 were excluded leaving 16 studies containing 5,320 unique participants included for analysis. There was no evidence of reported harm. Improved training and supervision were associated with better core outcomes. Although there was no apparent dose relationship, it appears that implementation issues are important and also that class and ethnicity were identified for areas of further study.


Art and the Social Work Profession: Shall Ever the Twain Meet?

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Research on Social Work Practice, Volume 29, Issue 6, Page 687-692, September 2019.
Despite evidence of widespread increasing interest in the arts as mechanisms for personal and social change, social work is conspicuous for its lack of organized conceptual attention to this area. This article argues that there are four potential perspectives that might be adopted as a means of expanding social work science and professional practice: the arts as adjunct to clinical treatment and healing, the arts as the “work” in social work, the arts as tool for social investment, and the arts as driver of political and ideological commitment. An argument is presented for a new vision of the profession in academic environments in which the arts are defined as one of the fundamental pillars. This might lead to reimagining of scholarship, the reconstruction of social work education, and acceleration of social reform.


Israeli Peace Nonprofits Promoting Social Good: Characteristics of Active and Inactive Organizations

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Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
Objectives:Our aim in this article is to understand the nonprofit organizations that declared to promote social good by focusing on peace and coexistence activities and assess why some survived under challenging contexts while others became inactive.Method:The study is based on a database of peace and coexistence organizations obtained from the registrar of associations in Israel. The nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) were divided into active and inactive organizations.Results:Our key findings suggest that Israeli-registered sustained peace/coexistence NGOs are those that do not focus on meetings between people from the conflicting sides, are centrally committed to peace/coexistence, and are anchored in the Jewish sector of the state.Conclusion:Our findings pave the way for social work entrepreneurs aiming to work toward peace and coexistence to better plan the establishment and sustainability of peace and coexistence NGOs.


Why Do the Democrats Keep Saying ‘Structural’?

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Candidates are promising a kind of change that history suggests they cannot deliver.


East Meets West: Five Decades of Practice Research in Hong Kong

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Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
A review of social work practice research in Hong Kong identified 969 articles published over 50 years. Four main areas of their content were analyzed: (a) authorship, (b) practice area, (c) target clientele, and (d) research method. Our results showed that academics had produced most of the research publications (81%). The most common practice areas were children and youth (20%), mental health (19%), family (19%), and the elderly (11%). Youth (22%), the elderly (14%), and family and parents (14%) were the top three client groups. The majority of the methods (47%) used were quantitative, comprising mostly correlational methods (41%). The future development of Hong Kong’s social work practice research should build on current achievements and promote more practitioner–researcher collaboration.